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Art Investment News editor and publisher Paul Ben-Itzak, who has also written for Reuters, the New York Times, and many others and also publishes the Dance Insider & Arts Voyager, is looking for work in France, where he lived and worked for 10 years. He is ready to include his magazines in any deal. Interested parties can e-mail Paul.


Art Investment News Gallery, 12-5: From collector to collection
An American Panorama at the Amon Carter

Left: Walt Kuhn (1877-1949), "Plumes, 1931." Oil on canvas. Acquired 1932, the Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.. From the exhibition "To see as artists see: American Art from the Phillips Collection," on view through January 6. Right: Marie Cosindas (b. 1925), "Andy Warhol, 1966." Dye diffusion transfer print. ©Marie Cosindas. Courtesy the artist. From the exhibition "Marie Cosindas: Instant Color," on view March 5 - May 26, 2013. Both events at the Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Fort Worth, Texas.

By Paul Ben-Itzak
Text copyright 2012 Paul Ben-Itzak

FORT WORTH, Texas -- Once upon a time a newspaper man named Amon Carter followed the recommendation of his friend Will Rogers, the great American humorist, philosopher, and actor, and spent about $5,000 on a couple of canvasses by the "cowboy artist" Charles M. Russell. He built his Russell (and Frederic Remington) collection until, by the time of his death, he was able to bequeath it to found the museum which for the past 51 years has born his name and which, by his decree, is always free, because Carter wanted children to have the advantages he didn't. The museum did not rest on its rawhide laurels, but grew up to be the greatest museum of American art in the world, in both its curatorial savvy and collecting prescience. It chose Stuart Davis as the one artist it was important to represent in all phases of his career, which, following the trajectory of art in the 20th century, took him from the stark literalism of the "ashcan" school to the wildest reaches of abstraction, never losing sight of reality. And, unlike so many museums which follow collecting trends, the Amon Carter anticipated at least one. Starting in the 1960s, it built a photography collection which dwarfs even that of the Museum of Modern Art.

It's been a while since we've caught up with the Amon Carter, so busy has the auction season been. So we're taking advantage of a breather in art sales to continue your -- and our -- ongoing arts education, always with a view to making us all better informed art investors, to offer this update in images of current and upcoming exhibitions at my favorite museum. Herewith you'll find images of work from the current exhibition "To see as artists see: American Art from the Phillips Collection," on view through January 6; "Marie Cosindas: Instant Color," running March 5 through May 26, 2013; "Big Pictures," on view March 5 - April 21; "Romaire Bearden: A Black Odyssey," May 18 - August 11; and "Larry Sultan's Homeland," closing January 13.


Left: Childe Hassam (1859?1935), "Washington Arch, Spring, 1890." Oil on canvas. Acquired 1921, the Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.. From the exhibition, "To see as artists see: American Art from The Phillips Collection," Right: Barbara Morgan (1900 - 1992). Printed by Modernage. "Martha Graham -- 'Lamentation,' 1935." Gelatin silver print, 1972. ©Barbara Brooks Morgan. Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas. Gift of the artist P1974.21.28. From the exhibition "Big Pictures," on view at the Amon Carter March 5 - April 21, 2013.


Edward Hopper (1882 - 1967), "Night Shadows, 1921." Etching. Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas, 1983.66.


John Sloan (1871 - 1951), "Six O'Clock, Winter, 1912." Oil on canvas. ©2011 Delaware Art Museum / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Acquired 1922, The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. . From the exhibition "To see as artists see: American Art from the Phillips Collection."


Jacob Lawrence (1917 - 2000), "The Migration Series, Panel no. 3: From every southern town migrants left by the hundreds to travel north," 1940 - 41. Casein tempera on hardboard. ©2011 the Jacob and Gwendolyn Lawrence Foundation, Seattle / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Acquired 1942, The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. . From the exhibition "To see as artists see: American Art from the Phillips Collection."


Left: Romare Bearden (1912 - 1988), "The Sea Nymph," 1977. Collage. Collection of Glen and Lynn Tobias. Right: Romare Bearden, Untitled, 1946. From the Iliad series. Ink on paper. Bearden Estate / Foundation, courtesy DC Moore Gallery. Both works on view May 18 - August 11, 2013 at the Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Fort Worth, Texas as part of "Romaire Bearden: A Black Odyssey."


William Henry Jackson (1843 - 1942), "Excursion Train. Lewiston Branch. N.Y.C. RR, 1890." Albumen silver print. Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas P1988.37.2. Part of the upcoming exhibition "Big Pictures."


Esther Bubley (1921 - 1998), "Street Scene. Saturday Afternoon. Huntsville, Texas, 1945." Gelatin silver print, 1982. Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas. Gift of Texas Monthly, Inc.. Printed from a negative in the Standard Oil of New Jersey Collection, University of Louisville Photographic Archives P1984.37.40. Part of the upcoming exhibition "Big Pictures."


David Levinthal (b. 1949), "[Cowboy]," 1988. From the Five Trails West series. Dye diffusion transfer print. ©1988 David Levinthal. Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas P1988.9. From the upcoming exhibition "Big Pictures."


Stuart Davis (1892-1964), "Blue Café," 1928. Oil on canvas. ©Estate of Stuart Davis / licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. Acquired 1930, The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. Part of the exhibition "To see as artists see: American Art from the Phillips Collection."


Larry Sultan (1946-2009), "Meander, Corte Madera, 2006." Digital dye coupler print. Collection of Andrew Pilara. From the exhibitioin "Larry Sultan's Homeland: American story," on view through January 13. (It may not look like much, but I was born here!)



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